Publications – Books

Book Cover final

Released October 1, 2019 from UBC Press: A World Without Martha: A Memoir of Sisters, Disability, and Difference is a book-length account of the impact of my sister’s institutionalization for intellectual disability on my sister, my family, and myself, contextualized through more than five decades of policy and social responses to developmental disabilities.

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Praise for A World Without Martha

“Beautifully written, deeply personal yet equally accessible, this memoir by Victoria Freeman takes us on a journey of discovery. It weaves together the pain, loss, and long road to healing of one family with the powerful social forces that led to the institutionalization of Martha Freeman and so many other children with disabilities, and, finally, the slow movement to return them to a valued place in society. A World without Martha is a painful, powerful, and ultimately hopeful story that will help the reader understand why we segregate some members of society, the terrible impact on them and their families, and what it means to be human.”

JOHN GUIDO, long-time member of L’Arche Daybreak and L’Arche Toronto, and Outreach Coordinator for L’Arche Canada

“Freeman’s candid account illuminates the complex and far-reaching effects of institutionalization in the family and brings insight to essential human concerns including love, abandonment, and acceptance. It makes an important contribution to our understanding of families’ experiences of separation and loss due to designations of ‘difference.’”

MADELINE BURGHARDT, author of Broken: Institutions, Families, and the Construction of Intellectual Disability

“Most memoirs written about people born with Down Syndrome have been authored by family members, often in a reassuring manner intended to destigmatize the condition for the general public. The tone of this book is strikingly different. It is full of regret, ambivalence, and conflict. There is no denying the honesty embedded in the author’s raw, unvarnished reflections of her family’s missed opportunities of acceptance and reconciliation.”

DAVID WRIGHT, author of Downs: The History of a Disability

“This is a raw, honest, and candid account of how institutional and ideological ableism – institutionalization and the separation of siblings as well as stigmatization, shame,
and marginalization – impacts individuals, families, and their
relationships in tragic, shattering, and unpredictable ways.”

PATRICIA DOUGLAS, Disability Studies, Faculty of Education, Brandon University

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Distant Relations: How My Ancestors Colonized North America (McClelland & Stewart, 2000; Steerforth Press (USA), 2002), 535 pages.

Distant Relations cover

Shortlist finalist for the 2000 Writers’ Trust Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing.

One of NOW Magazine’s Top Ten books for 2000.

Reviews:
American Historical Review
The Globe and Mail
The Toronto Star
Macleans
The Beaver
Anishinabek News, etc.

 

Edited Collections and Proceedings

Women and Words anthologyWomen and Words proceedingsCo-editor, Women and Words: The Anthology/ Les femmes et les mots, l’Anthologie (Madiera Park, BC: Harbour Publishing, 1984), a bilingual anthology of 79 Canadian women writers.

Co-editor, with Daphne Marlatt, Betsy Warland, and Barbara Pulling, In the Feminine: Women and Words/Les femmes et les mots Conference Proceedings (Edmonton: Longspoon Press, 1986)

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